Making Art Progress, not Art Products

A fundamental distinction all developing artists need to know

The title is a slight paraphrase of Tim Packer’s words, during one of his mentor-ship YouTube videos with Brooke Cormier. At first, it might not make much sense, however after letting it sink in for a while you will realise it is actually fundamental for any beginner or developing artist’s learning process. Tim talked about a clear distinction between an artist’s work phases and this is exactly what we will look in slightly deeper detail in this article. To enrich the text with some visual content, I will be sharing corresponding pieces of my own work below.

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Feeling pressure for making art? Just get f*cking over it!

Don’t let the pressure ruin it for you.

Like so many fellow artists, I used to take myself very seriously. I lacked self-confidence and considered my creations as something holy and untouchable. I even made up a rule that kept me from retouching a piece of work once I had signed it. For someone who is completely oblivious about the creative process, that might sound ridiculous, but in the artist’s mind, it totally makes sense. In mine, it did.

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Key reasons to start an art blog

Open new ways for your art

Blogging is not easy. Making art is not easy either. Making art and blogging at the same time…well this is a challenge. And I ve been experiencing this for some time myself. There is though some strange force, pulling me to do it and I am sure if you read the list below and spend some time thinking about it; you will quickly see my point. Running an art blog is quite a task, however there are some advantages that totally make it worth your time and effort. Why would you start an art blog then?

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The secret behind Inktober’s success

A phenomenon that started for fun

Inktober started in 2009 by Jake Parker. It has since grown into a worldwide thing with thousands of artists taking up the challenge every year. The amount of beautiful ink drawings filling our social media feed is incredible; making this month very interesting artistically. What is the secret though behind Inktober’s big success?

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PROFESSIONAL SKETCHES IN 3 STEPS

PROFESSIONAL SKETCHES IN 3 STEPS

Technique and Attitude

It is very common for beginner artists to start a new drawing and despite putting a lot of effort and time into, the result still shows lack of technique and experience. If this has happened to you, don’t panic; you are not the only one. There are different ways of improving the quality of your drawing quite easily and fast. Some would call it technique; I would say it is more of an attitude towards the way you make art. Following these 3 easy steps, it is more than certain that your next drawing will look much better!

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How to make time for art, daily

5 Steps bringing you closer to art

If you are not a professional full time artist, you have most probably struggled at some stage to make time for art. Our daily routine can sometimes be tough and leave no space for anything else than work, family or other obligations. On the other hand, if you are reading this, it means that art provides you with a good shelter of relaxation and expression; and thus it is an important part of your life. How can we find the right balance though and incorporate art in our life daily? Well, it is not too complicated!

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5 things beginner artists need

Start is tough; unless you know how to deal with it

Starting painting is tempting, however it is not very easy to keep yourself motivated after a few unsuccessful sessions. There are a few reasons why people give up, and there are a few ways to help you move forward. Being a beginner artist myself I understand that although improving the painting technique is a never-ending process, keeping yourself motivated is a matter of a few simple steps.

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THE BRIGHT SIDE

THE BRIGHT SIDE

The Skull – Side

It is very cool being able to draw the front part of the skull; we used to do that since we were in school. If you want to understand though the volume of the skull, the structure of the bones and mainly how all these affect the proportions and arrangement of the facial features, then you really need to be looking at the side of the skull too. It is important to know what the proportions are and this is exactly what we are going to study today. As always, this drawing might not be 100% accurate, but it will definitely be a good starting point for you to understand and expand your knowledge in the long run.

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Aristotle

Ancient Greek portraits

An Ancient Greek philosopher which is a dominant figure in my home city. Aristotle is one of the most important and famous personalities of Ancient Greece and streets, universities and squares have been named after him in modern Greek cities. Aristotle was born in Stagira (norther Greece) and was a student of Plato in Athens. After his teacher’s death, Aristotle was invited to teach Alexander the Great (previous bust drawing – BUST -2). His teachings are foundation of the modern Western Philosophy and cover many areas as physics, biology, arts, politics and psychology.

The inspiration to draw this bust is now obvious. It was a good exercise for me, getting the proportions of the face  and the shape of head right. I quickly put a small grid on my paper and tried to measure the proportions of the width and length of his face.  First step was to locate the zone of his eyes. That gave me a good reference point to build the rest of his face. I achieved this by defining the forehead’s proportion to the rest of the face.

Once the eyes were roughly in place it was easier to define the position of other features. I started top to to bottom. Firstly, I tried to deal with the nose by making it proportionally right to the forehead. The width of the nose was measured proportionally to its length.

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With the nose roughly sketched I looked at the width and position of the mouth and chin. The width of the lips roughly lines up with the middle of the eyes. The chin literally occurred by sketching the outline of the lips. This areas is easier to draw by adding tone rather than trying to precisely sketch outlines.

A new element for me was the hair. It was a challenging task to decide how to better sketch the hair. I am not sure this is the best way to do it yet but it seemed a bit easier roughly shaping it and then defining it better by adding tone. The same applies to hair on the head and facial hair.

After having on my paper and being satisfied that I don’t want to add any more details (mainly because at this point I am quite tired already) I add some highlights by rubbing out the charcoal or strengthen the tone in some places. This way I increase the contrast and make the drawing a bit more impressive. Still working on this though!

I hope you enjoyed! You can see my previous bust drawing here:

DSC_006923 - Αντίγραφο busts mobile

THE ARTIST SAYS…

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“Busts is a collection of charcoal drawings which represents my first steps in the world of life drawing and drawing of human figures and faces in general. In these first drawings I am just trying to put in practice the theory that I read in sketching books or the instructions that our tutor gives during our life drawing classes. Hopefully, as I progress and practice more, the quality of my drawings will improve and more confident lines and powerful tone contrasts will appear.”

Art is more fun when you meet the artists themselves. Meet the man behind the  scenes. Visit THE ARTIST… 

Love Sketching and Painting

CHROMA

Παρουσίαση2 - Αντίγραφο

Alexander The Great

Ancient Greeks – Portraits

This is a bust of Alexander The Great! I decided to start drawing this one because it looked a bit simpler and also because it is one of my dad’s favourite historical figures. The main lesson I got from this one is that even if the charcoal produces beautiful contrasts with the white paper…you still need to be careful not to overdo it. I believe I used more charcoal than necessary resulting in a “smudged” tone in some areas! A mistake to be avoided!

You can see that although the final result is quite impressive thanks to the strong contrast between the dark charcoal and white paper, in reality the drawing starts in a very basic format. You must focus on getting the basic proportions correct. This is the first step. Then you can build up adding tone and details. But remember…the most detailed drawing…will just look bad if the basic proportions are not right! Spend some time in the beginning to get that foundation correct!

This ties in brilliantly with my Life Drawing classes. See sketches from the weekly life drawing classes I joined recently here:

LIFE DRAWING

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THE ARTIST…

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“Busts is a collection of charcoal drawings which represents my first steps in the world of life drawing and drawing of human figures and faces in general. In these first drawings I am just trying to put in practice the theory that I read in sketching books or the instructions that our tutor gives during our life drawing classes. Hopefully, as I progress and practice more, the quality of my drawings will be improving with more confident lines and more powerful tone contrasts.”

Art is more fun when you meet the artists themselves. Meet the man behind the  scenes. Visit THE ARTIST… 

Love Sketching and Painting

CHROMA

Παρουσίαση2 - Αντίγραφο