Socrates

Ancient Greeks – Portraits

Continuing the line of Classical Greek philosophers, this is the bust of Socrates. Socrates is one of the founders of western philosophy and despite not having any surviving writings of his, references by others inform us about his valuable work and thoughts. Socrates was teacher of Plato who in turn was teacher of Aristotle (see BUST – 3); all of them very important philosophers of Ancient Greece.

This bust; as previously; is drawn using charcoal and a kneadable eraser. After tone was applied I just used my finger tips to blend where required. Similar technique and steps were followed as previous pieces of this collection (see BUSTS).

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A very rough grid was drawn firstly. To do this I just compared the total length of the bust to its total width (not including the plinth). Doing this helped me define the correct proportions of the main shape of the head. In this case, as the bust is slightly tilted to the left, defining the middle point of the face was not particularly helpful. I trusted my instinct and after measuring the proportion of the forehead compared to the total length of the head I made the first charcoal marks showing Socrates’ eyes and eyebrows. To be as accurate as possible and to take into account the perspective of the “mask” I used a slender needle and plotted on my paper the lines connecting the ends of the two eye brows. In the same step I quickly sketched the outline of the nose too.

Using the same technique (needle to measure proportions of lines and angles caused by perspective) I formed the outline of the head and roughly sketched the hairline. After the basic shape of the philosopher’s face was on my sketch pad, I erased back to the point I was just able to see my previous lines. I then started to define better all lines and make more confident charcoal marks.

…I erased back to the point I was just able to see my previous lines…

When I felt comfortable with the shapes and outlines I had, I moved on to my favourite part…adding tone! First, I added smaller amounts of tone just to define different planes on the man’s face. Forehead, cheeks and chin are probably the ones that will make your drawing stand out immediately. From then on it is a matter of adding detail and showing the shadows and light on the face more accurately.

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Final step after I am happy that the amount of detail I wanted to show is there…is to go back and strengthen the tone and highlights where necessary. I quite enjoy this final process as I believe it makes my drawing more vivid and the additional contrasts capture the eye and attention.

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Drawing Socrates was very enjoyable and helped me understand better how face lines work in perspective when the head is slightly turned to the one side!

I hope you enjoyed reading this! You can see my previous bust drawings here:

DSC_006923 - Αντίγραφο busts mobile

THE ARTIST SAYS…

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“Busts is a collection of charcoal drawings which represents my first steps in the world of life drawing and drawing of human figures and faces in general. In these first drawings I am just trying to put in practice the theory that I read in sketching books or the instructions that our tutor gives during our life drawing classes. Hopefully, as I progress and practice more, the quality of my drawings will improve and more confident lines and powerful tone contrasts will appear.”

Art is more fun when you meet the artists themselves. Meet the man behind the  scenes. Visit THE ARTIST… 

Love Sketching and Painting

CHROMA

Παρουσίαση2 - Αντίγραφο

BUST – 1

This is my first ever attempt to draw a bust. When I was a student a few years ago, taking free hand and architectural drawing classes I was always jealous of one thing! I was jealous of my classmates who were preparing for the Fine Arts School exams.

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They had to train sketching busts. All shorts of Ancient Greek philosophers, poets and politicians were standing there on  the selves ready to be drawn! It was so amazingly impressive how the students used to use charcoal and within minutes their white paper would turn into the face of a philosopher. The contrast between heavy black and plain light describing the sculptures’ surfaces would just amaze me. I wanted to be able to do this….and here I am! Starting with this first bust…not quite sure who this is but definitely a good start!

 

This ties in brilliantly with my Life Drawing classes. See sketches from the weekly life drawing classes I joined recently here:

LIFE DRAWING

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LIFE DRAWING


 

 

THE ARTIST…

28407451_1162363890564038_455176961_o“Busts is a collection of charcoal drawings which represents my first steps in the world of life drawing and drawing of human figures and faces in general. In these first drawings I am just trying to put in practice the theory that I read in sketching books or the instructions that our tutor gives during our life drawing classes. Hopefully, as I progress and practice more, the quality of my drawings will be improving with more confident lines and more powerful tone contrasts.”

Art is more fun when you meet the artists themselves. Meet the man behind the  scenes. Visit THE ARTIST… 

 

Love Sketching and Painting

CHROMA

Παρουσίαση2 - Αντίγραφο

 

PAINTING & UNESCO

Painting & UNESCO

Main Hall of Educational Institution

Feeling really proud and honoured as one of my paintings, “Harmonising Aspects of Civilisations”, is permanently displayed in the private educational institution “Fryganiotis“.

This painting was created in 2015 for the opening of the 1st UNESCO Student Symposium in northern Greece which was held in the premises of the private school. Since then it has been displayed permanently in the main hall of the school and has been admired by a large number of visitors, students and members staff every year.

Excerpt from the Symposium’s site:

The Greek World Heritage Sites

“…The aim of the symposium is to motivate students to participate in a constructive dialogue, through which will be presented all aspects of the relationship of young people with the monuments, the problems and challenges of maintenance, use and abuse of the most important monuments of our country….”

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…the painting has been displayed permanently in the main hall of the school and has been admired by a large number of visitors…


Recently, the painting was spotted online as part of the school’s promotional posts on Facebook. The approx 1.0m x 1.2m acrylic painting of Parthenon was the background of an informational post regarding the school’s success in a local Chess Competition.

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Student’s face blurred to protect privacy

The painting was gifted to the school along with a description of the artistic meaning and thought process during its creation. Read here (original in Greek below):

Painting Title: Harmonising Aspects of Civilisations

In an era when there is no border between civilisations and the cultural influences mix characteristics, customs and traditions in a very fast pace, there are milestones to remind us not only the past but also its versatility to co-exist with the present.

This modern Parthenon, painted with  purposely less detail, stands in the crossing line between the old and the modern underlining the possibility of those two standing together in a unique combination. Main ingredient of this combination is the Greek civilisation itself. On the one hand the classical Greek civilisation in blue with consistent, solid and certain brushstrokes as it would be suitable for the foundation of any structure. On the other hand the modern Greek civilisation, which is founded on the principles of the ancient one, however is the recipient of a storm of influences from other cultures and is in a constant process of modernisation, adaptation and renewal.

The two faces of the Greek civilisation are in a constant dialog through Parthenon, the most famous and emblematic structure of classical Greece, reminding to the observer that the new and the old are mainly tied together rather than clashing.

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28407451_1162363890564038_455176961_oTHE ARTIST…

My warmest regards and thanks to the private school Fryganiotis for appreciating and displaying my art.  For more of my work visit THE ARTIST…  or explore CHROMA.

 

TESS

09/04/2018

After three long weeks of no drawing classes due to the Easter break, yesterday evening we gathered again at the Bath Artists Studios for another very fruitful session…with a new model this time!

Yesterday we had the chance to draw Tess, a young girl of medium height and with a well weighted body. Our tutor highlighted that the main focus during that session should be on the shape of the muscles when they stretch or they contract. The tutor asked Tess to do 3 short poses (about 5mins each) where she would either stretch her arms upwards or bend to the front so her back muscles have a more sculpted shape.

For the long pose the model was sat on a stool on a table. I had a very interesting position as this time my horizon (eyes level – read more here) was lower than my subject. Also, the crossed legs of the pose were a challenge for me, especially considering that the foreshortening of the front leg distorted slightly the proportions (see bottom photograph).


…the foreshortening of the front leg distorted slightly the proportions…


Unfortunately,  i didn’t have the time to complete the shape of the head or the tones in that area. However this should not be a problem as we will have the same model for the next two weeks. I managed to add tone to the body and that is a personal success as have recently struggled to complete a drawing within the time available during class. I am really looking forward to challenging myself the next weeks adding more detail to my work!

See work from previous sessions: LIFE DRAWING

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28407451_1162363890564038_455176961_oThe Artist says:

“The life drawing classes I joined recently are getting on fine. It takes a lot of effort and practice but i believe that my hard work is being rewarded with slightly better shaped figures and added tone. Also, I have learned to use charcoal more effectively now and I think I wouldn’t go back to use of pencil for a larger scale drawing. Let’s see where this drawing trip takes us…

 

 

Love Painting and Sketching

CHROMA

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