HOW 15 EGGS CAN AFFECT YOUR ART?

HOW 15 EGGS CAN AFFECT YOUR ART?

DISCOVER THE SIMPLE

This is not an easy question to answer. Eggs can make a big difference when you make an omellete or when you bake a cake. But art; how is it even possible a tub of eggs to make a difference to your art? Well, it does play an important role – a tab of 15 eggs can actually make you create one of the most sophisticated and beautiful artworks you have ever made. The recipe is very simple.

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How to make time for art, daily

5 Steps bringing you closer to art

If you are not a professional full time artist, you have most probably struggled at some stage to make time for art. Our daily routine can sometimes be tough and leave no space for anything else than work, family or other obligations. On the other hand, if you are reading this, it means that art provides you with a good shelter of relaxation and expression; and thus it is an important part of your life. How can we find the right balance though and incorporate art in our life daily? Well, it is not too complicated!

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5 things beginner artists need

Start is tough; unless you know how to deal with it

Starting painting is tempting, however it is not very easy to keep yourself motivated after a few unsuccessful sessions. There are a few reasons why people give up, and there are a few ways to help you move forward. Being a beginner artist myself I understand that although improving the painting technique is a never-ending process, keeping yourself motivated is a matter of a few simple steps.

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WHAT DRIVES YOUR BLOG?

WHAT DRIVES YOUR BLOG?

Let your passion lead the way

If you are an artist and you have started or thought of starting a blog soon; chances are you will understand straightaway how I am feeling. I got the idea of starting an art blog a few months ago; it feels we have gone a long way since then. The initial intention was to just create a sort of online gallery where my latest paintings could be shown. However, as the months passed, the blog evolved into a process of digesting art and knowledge rather than just showing my work.

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Colour Theory – Shapes

SHAPES ON CANVAS

DRAW OUTLINES FOR YOUR PAINTINGS

Today we will keep the article very short and simple; not because sketching is an easy job but because going into very deep detail is beyond the scope of this tutorial. For more information about sketching you might want to start reading here:

In any case, applying sketching knowledge to painting will definitely help you and allow you to progress and understand things faster. Very roughly, due to perspective, shapes distort; for realistic paintings you have to draw in perspective rather than regular shapes as you already know them (read here). Also, tones change due to distance; colours look paler as you move further away and more vibrant and “complete” as you come closer. We will cover all these aspects in due course. Regarding the basic shapes for painting, all you need is either a hard pencil (HB, H or 2H) or a thin brush and acrylic paint.


Previous Article: COLOUR THEORY – COMPLEMENTARY COLOURS


 

Using a Pencil

In the first case, using a hard pencil will allow you to draw your basic shapes and will prevent leaving very heavy and bold marks (which would definitely happen when using soft pencils 2B, 3B etc or charcoal). Light marks on your canvas can easily be covered with paint. Also, you will avoid mixing your paint with black dust (ie. charcoal) which will make the final result dirtier and darker. Of course you can always apply more than one layers of paint to avoid this problem; it’s entirely up to you. I just find it easier to roughly and lightly sketch the shape using a hard pencil and then paint on top of that. See below:

Light marks on your canvas can easily be covered with paint…

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Using brush and paint

In the second case you start shaping your subject directly using paint and brushes. This is very good fun for two reasons. If you use reasonably diluted paint you can always rub it back and clean your canvas. It might leave a mark on your blank canvas but you shouldn’t worry too much as this can easily be covered by the next layer of colour. The second reason is that using a brush and paint you can’t be too precise with your shapes; this way you avoid spending ages detailing something you will then completely cover with paint. I find this technique quite easy, fast, fun and relieves me off the stress of detailed drawing. Of course the amount of detail you want to add is up to you but remember…this is just a trace to help you paint a bit more accurately later.

…avoid spending ages detailing something you will then completely cover with paint.

Few tips when using a brush:

  • Use diluted paint – it’s easier to cover it up later
  • Use light colours – for the same reason
  • Use slightly thicker paint for shapes that are closer to you (gives a sense of perspective – helpful for you); see the blue garlics above.
  • Start simple and experiment – trying a very complicated composition will not help you – most probably will frustrate you.
  • Use less  defined shapes as it is less probable to look wrong (a wobbly building looks very wrong while a wobbly tomato looks like a wobbly tomato…still tasty though!)
  • You might want to use a combination of pencil (for some basic shapes or for perspective lines…) and brush (for rougher shaping afterwards.

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Materials

Presumably, you have already experimented with one technique or the other. I would suggest you choose a simple subject (like the bananas and the apple I sketched above) and try shaping the outlines on two separate canvases using both techniques. You will have the chance to compare the two sketches in terms of detail, speed, accuracy and ease. Allow for 0.5 hour.

  • A small brush (a round brush will be helpful),
  • Some diluted acrylic paint (light colours will be covered easier when you block in colour later).
  • Cloth to erase/rub the paint if you need.
  • 2x Canvas (canvas pad – easier and cheaper for this exercise)
  • A hard (2H or H) pencil  (for part of your sketch you might want to try using a soft pencil – 3B or softer to see the difference).
  • Rubber

 

A quick summary of the above is here:

  • Principles of Perspective and Tone.
  • Pencil – More detailed sketch – think if necessary
  • Brush – less detailed but quick and easy

The Artist says:

28407451_1162363890564038_455176961_o“I have been passionate about painting since I remember myself. I started by just eexperimenting with colours, colour mixing and colour application. However , it’s not always easy to achieve what you want unless you know exactly what you are doing. Techniques are different for different media; colour theory though is the basis of painting and is the same for everything! I decided to teach myself the basics; and here I am sharing that with you!

 

 

Art is more fun when you meet the artists themselves! Visit THE ARTIST…

CHROMA

Love Sketching & Painting

Παρουσίαση2

 

 

GEMMA HARE


Artist’s Bio and other Featured Artists at the end of the page.


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THE ARTIST SAYS:

34826150_185746302130651_4239787175383662592_n.jpg“Gemma Hare is a fine artist residing in Aberdeen.

After graduating from Edinburgh College of Art in 2005 with a BA (hons) in Drawing and Painting, Gemma became a primary teacher, which has led her to work with children in different school settings as well as facilitating art workshops.

Her work is inspired by everyday objects and experiences, such as plants, people, places and text. She enjoys experimenting with different media and processes.

Gemma also incorporates printmaking and stencilling techniques to build multi – layered pieces.

Gemma’s current series has a new focus. Her work looks at bee preservation, through the use of her layering and colour composition, with a painted bee as a focal point. These pieces also incorporate some text, relating to the issue of bee decline and its consequences.

Gemma has been creating work again since November 2018 and is beginning to experiment with creating print editions, as well as one off originals. She has taken part in recent exhibitions in Aberdeenshire and Edinburgh so far. Gemma is happy to accept commissions and discuss her work with others.

  

 

Loved Gemma’s art? Follow her work on social media:

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Gemma’s portfolio: https://ghareartist.portfoliobox.net/

 

Visit our other FEATURED ARTISTS:

Do you think your Αrt could be featured?

Let us know by clicking below:

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Colour Theory – Basics

COLOUR WHEEL

THE FOUNDATION OF COLOUR THEORY

I recently decided to teach myself the basics of colour theory; I started with the colour wheel. This provides the fundamental background of colour combination and allows you to further develop techniques. In following articles we will explore other aspects of colour mixing and combination.

Materials:

Keep it as simple as possible. The aim is to explore the colours and their combinations, not to make the most beautiful colour wheel ever created.  Allow for 1.5 hours.

  • A small brush (any type will do),
  • Yellow Acrylic Paint
  • Blue Acrylic Paint
  • Red Acrylic Paint
  • Canvas (canvas pad – easier and cheeper for this exercise)
  • A pencil and a rubber

 

…fundamental background of colour combination…allows you to further develop techniques.

The principle of the colour wheel is very simple. You start using the three basic colours; red, yellow and blue. These colours are called the primary colours and are the base and main components of every other colour. Having these three and mixing them in different quantities allows you to mix any other colour. The primary colours wheel is the one right below.

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Once you have created the primary colours wheel then, we are ready to start mixing those three together to create our second colour wheel; the wheel of secondary colours. The colours sitting opposite each other in the secondary colour wheel are called complementary colours (this will be useful for creating shadows – see next article). As you might already know mixing the primary colours with each other gives you a first set of very useful colours: Orange, Green and Purple.

  • Blue + Yellow = Green
  • Red + Yellow = Orange
  • Blue + Red = Purple

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The second step has now been made. We have our secondary colours filling the second wheel. Final step is to create a third colour which will be filled with the tertiary colours. As you can easily guess, mixing the primary colours in different quantities (exactly as you did for the secondary colours above) gives you greens, purples and oranges of different strength. So here you can experiment and create colours you like more by mixing slightly more blue, or a bit more yellow or maybe a bit more red? Create as many mixes you like. For the sake of this exercise I created only a couple of each combination.

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A quick summary of the previous steps is here:

  • Primary colours are: Yellow, Blue, Red
  • Secondary colours are: Orange, Green, Purple
  • Tertiary colours are: The combinations of primary colours  using different quantities of each colour. Create Yellowish Green or Blueish Purple etc.

 


The Artist says:

28407451_1162363890564038_455176961_o“I have been passionate about painting since I remember myself. I started by just eexperimenting with colours, colour mixing and colour application. However , it’s not always easy to achieve what you want unless you know exactly what you are doing. Techniques are different for different media; colour theory though is the basis of painting and is the same for everything! I decided to teach myself the basics; and here I am sharing that with you!

 

 

 

 

Art is more fun when you meet the artists themselves! Visit THE ARTIST…

CHROMA

Love Sketching & Painting

Παρουσίαση2

 

JUIF GAETAN


Aurore

House2

House

Snake

La vie en Rose

 


THE ARTIST SAYS:

e1ZjOzpJuif Gaetan is seriously interested in painting in the age of 25. He is self-taught painter working mainly on the paint substance, experimenting by adding unconventional materials like coffee and acid. His first achievements dealt only with the work of the susbtance of paint itself in an instinctive way. Only hand-made and slowly he goes to a more representational style for to be able to communicate also other messages; that only that of the instinct.

He is also an author, songwriter and performer, having realized 7 albums to date.

  

 

Loved Juif’s art? Follow his work on social media:

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Visit our other FEATURED ARTISTS:

Do you think your Αrt could be featured?

Let us know by clicking below:

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ALICE FRANKOVICH


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THE ARTIST SAYS:

31948992_1913624328928297_6364340306522931200_n.jpgMy name is Alice Frankovich. I am a self taught abstract/fluid artist based in San Diego, California. Growing up, both of my parents were very artistic. My dad had an extraordinary imagination and my mom could draw or paint just about anything. Their influence definitely contributed to the love and need for art to be a part of my life. For years, my medium was just a #2 pencil. I spent countless hours as a teenager sketching animals, nature, and even portraits of my friends. Over time I dabbled in pottery, fimo clay, water colours, and candle making. About 10 years ago, I started to paint acrylic abstracts and absolutely loved it. About a year ago, I stumbled upon fluid painting. I still paint with brushes and dabble in other mediums, but fluid painting has become my favourite medium. With this medium, there is little control, and I am loving that challenge. Learning different ways to manipulate the paint into a design or something that is beautiful, has been extraordinarily fun and rewarding.

  

 

Loved Alice’s art? Follow her work on social media:

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DINA AYOUB

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THE ARTIST SAYS:

30831543_1857003791031089_1677926444_n.jpg“Hi! I’m Dina from Dee’s Fine Art. I live in Seattle, and am originally from Egypt. I used to be a product manager in the tech industry but a few years ago I quit to pursue my artistic ambitions. I wrote a fantasy novel that will be published soon, and have taken up full time painting. I use both oil and acrylic paints, but I really love the oils. I love painting fluid art, abstract art, landscapes, and am currently fascinated with painting the human figure.”

  

 

Loved Dina’s art? Follow her work on social media:

 

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or visit her website here: www.deesfineart.com

 

Visit our other FEATURED ARTISTS:

Do you think your Αrt could be featured?

Click below and let us know!

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